Sunday, May 4, 2014

Elmira Prison Camp Sesquicentennial Living History Event May 3

Forgive me for being geeked out today. History has been a passion of mine since I was in middle school. (No need to tell you all exactly how many years ago that was. Suffice to say, my youngest child is now in middle school.) But not just history, local history. And Civil War history. It was like the perfect triumvirate of awesome yesterday when my family and I attended a living history event commemorating the Civil War prison camp's 150th anniversary along the banks of the Chemung River. 



A few quick facts about Elmira Prison Camp:
  • Called Hellmira by the Confederates imprisoned there.
  • From May 3, 1864 when barracks #3 were converted to house prisoners to July 1665 when the last prisoners were mustered out, 24 % of its population died.
  • disease, starvation, putrid water supply, exposure to extreme weather, and overcrowding are among causes of high death rate.
  • Highest death rate of any camp, North or South--even than Andersonville.
  • built to house 5,000 men, population swelled to 10,000 within weeks. 

bridge to Foster's Island--me in background
With this dramatic history, it seemed especially meaningful yesterday as the Chemung Living History Association came together with reenactors to present the event on Foster Pond near the actual campgrounds. 

fixin' tater soup


inspecting the troops before battle

Union soldiers fire first shots
Virginia Infantry answer the Union volley

Chaplain praying for dying soldier





13 comments:

  1. Interesting. I would've greed out too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for coming by, Tina! It was definitely one of those awesome moments.

      Delete
  2. Love this post, Kathy! So interesting. Sounds like you had a fun day. Wish I could have joined you. Great pictures, too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Debbie Lynne. I would have LOVED it if you could have been here. We bought Lucas a little Yankee kepi hat and it looked adorable on him. :)

      Delete
    2. Should I get Kase a confederate hat and they can get their pictures taken together? LOL

      Delete
    3. yes! That would be so awesome! :D

      Delete
  3. I never heard a thing about this. Not that I would have been able to go, but I'm not THAT far away. Thanks for sharing, Kathy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry, Deb. I thought I mentioned it on one of your posts about a month ago, but I may not have tagged you to make sure you saw it. They had it today, too, but I didn't go. It was pretty cool.

      Delete
  4. Wonderful post, Kathy. I'm sure it was exciting to view the re-enactor's in uniform after all the research you've done on the prison. Enjoyed the photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found out that a committee is trying to raise funds to build a replica of one of the buildings on the site as a tangible and visual memorial to the camp. Pretty cool!

      Delete
  5. Hello,

    My name is Molly Sipling and I am the Audience Development Assistant in the Fiction Department at Moody Publishers. I have recently come across your blog due to your interest in writing reviews of fiction novels. In April, we released The Turning, a fictional devotional title from award-winning author Davis Bunn.

    “A voice resonated from a distance and somehow from within. . .
    Against all earthly logic, it carried a divine command. And five very different people knew they were summoned to obey. They realize that one small personal response unveiled a new realm of moral responsibility. And this affirmation of everyday hope captures the attention of millions.

    Malicious elements soon align themselves to counter the trend. To terminate the movement they must also undermine its source. Can we really believe that God speaks to people today? Surely this must be dismissed as superstition or delusion. These well-intentioned but misguided individuals should not be allowed to cast our society back into the Dark Ages—power and money are at stake.

    The movement may herald a profound renewal – one that some are calling The Turning…”

    Interact with these characters in this devotional title and learn along with them how to hear and heed the voice of God. You can find out more, as well as access downloadable devotionals, at www.TheTurningBook.com. We are asking if you would be willing to write a review of this book for us and, in exchange, we will send you two copies of the book, one for you to read and review and the other to use as part of a giveaway on your blog.

    If you would be willing to do this, please e-mail me back at RNFiction@gmail.com with your mailing address. We will send you the copies of the book in return for your honest review.

    Thank you for your time!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Goodness, I wish I had seen this when you first wrote it last year. I wrote a short story that involved a Civil War reenactment, and I would certainly have begged for permission to use one of your photos to go with it!

    I have roots in Chemung, too. I'm descended from the Christian Loop family. :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think this is an informative post and it is very useful and knowledgeable. therefore, I would like to thank you for the efforts you have made in writing this article.

    ReplyDelete